bed bug icon

BED BUGS

  • Do bed bugs fly?
    +
  • Do bed bugs transmit diseases?
    +
  • How far will bed bugs travel?
    +
  • How do bed bugs develop?
    +
  • How long can a bed bug go without a blood meal?
    +
  • Are bed bugs only found in bedding?
    +
  • Can you smell bed bugs?
    +
  • What do bed bugs feed on?
    +
  • Can other animals become infested with bed bugs?
    +
  • How did they get into my house?
    +
  • Why have bed bugs become such a problem?
    +
  • Why is it so costly to treat for bed bugs?
    +
  • Can you see them?
    +
  • After a treatment can I get them again? How?
    +
  • What attracts them to us?
    +
  • Are there different kinds of bed bugs?
    +
  • Can you freeze bed bugs? What happens?
    +
  • Can I get rid of bed bugs?
    +
  • How do I know if I have a bed bug problem?
    +
  • Where can I find bed bugs in my home, or apartment?
    +
  • Does Get Rid Pest offer programs to treat bed bugs?
    +
  • Where can you get bed bugs?
    +
  • What can you do to help prevent bringing these pests into my home?
    +

History

The Bed Bug evolved from the Bat Bug which feed on Bats in caves. 100,000 years ago Neanderthal man lived in caves and was also fed upon by these bugs. Eventually, the bat bug evolved into a new species we call the Bed Bug. When humans left the cave life and settled into villages, towns and cities they brought the bugs with them. Bed bugs have plagued man ever since.

The early writings about bed bugs appeared in ancient Egypt around 400 BC and the oldest bed bug found is an Egyptian fossil from 3500 years ago. They were also reported in early Roman and Greek writings. Medieval Europeans were also plagued by bed bugs. Not only were the poor living with these blood sucking pests but even the kings and noblemen were infested with bed bugs. It was also common to be infested with blood sucking lice. The most feared pest however, was the rat.

The rat meant that the deadly Black Death or Plague was about to break out. Bed Bugs continued to live side by side with people throughout history. Then during World War II, a miracle chemical, DDT was developed. DDT was so effective against bed bugs that after WWII they were no longer considered a pest problem. From the 1950's through the turn of the century, problems with bed bugs were virtually non-existent.

Making a Comeback

Suddenly in 2000, it was discovered that bed bugs were making a comeback. Pest management firms began providing Bed Bug abatement services more and more often. Health departments across the USA began to receive more and more inquires about this pest. It soon became clear that we were in the midst of a widespread, sudden, population increase in bed bugs and we had no idea why. Calls about bed bugs increased more than 500% between 2001 and 2008! The health department also reported that calls regarding bed bugs had increased 700% over the same period.

Why, after almost a 60 year absence had bed bugs reemerged so suddenly and in such high numbers? The answers are not clear. However, some theories have been voiced. Changes in pest management practices, loss of a number of residual-type pesticides and increases in international traveling have been proposed. In addition to these theories, there may also have been some cultural and generational factors. For two generations in the US, bed bugs were not even spoken about. For the baby boomers, bed bugs were something that their parents and grandparents had to deal with. People immigrating into the United States from places where bed bugs were a common problem were inadvertently transporting these pests with them. After settling down and finding bed bugs, little was done to eliminate them because culturally they were accepted in their homelands.

The question remains; how do we send these pests packing? Before we can think about managing these pests we must have a detailed understanding of their biology including habits and behavior. This information is readily available in Entomology textbooks. However, most people will get this information from the World Wide Web. Most of the information is correct and based on solid scientific works. However, there is much information that is purely anecdotal. Publically-accessed web-based and print-media information has created panic and chaos.

Since most people below the age of 60 have had no experience with bed bugs, the mere thought of some bug visiting you in your bed at night to suck your blood creates terror in the minds of most Americans. We generally fear things that we do not fully understand.

So what is the answer? The aesthetic threshold is different for everybody. Some people will tolerate a certain level of pests. Others will not tolerate one fruit fly. When it comes to bed bugs however, everybody wants them totally eliminated, period! As pest management professionals, "we have met the enemy and they are ours"! Although bed bugs are difficult to eliminate, Get Rid, Termite and Pest Control Services LLC.. has developed protocols to address these age-old persistent, blood-sucking parasites. With over 18 years of experience providing pest management services, we have learned how to overcome pest problems in the urban environment, even though bed bugs do present some unique challenges.

For one thing, pesticides alone are not sufficient to address bed bugs in structures. You must inspect very carefully. You must identify all harborage sites. You must physically remove the bugs from the harborages using an industrial HEPA-equipped vacuum cleaner. Then treat harborages as required with materials that have shown promise in killing these pests. Since these pests will hide in the smallest, most inaccessible places, knowledge of bed bug habits and biology is essential to the favorable outcome of our abatement interventions.

After performing well over 700 bed bug interventions over the last 4 years, we have learned a thing or two about bed bug behavior. The most important thing we have learned about bed bugs is that it is very labor intensive to eliminate them. Every piece of furniture must be closely inspected. Mattresses, box spring, bed frames, head boards, night stands, dressers, lamps, wall hangings, ceiling and baseboard moldings, window treatments, closets, electronic devices such as computers, radios, fax machines, printers, door frames, window frames, electrical wall outlets and switch plate covers, recessed lighting, chairs, sofas, books, papers and magazines, list goes on and on. Bed bugs will hide under paint chips and inside cell phones. We keep finding new places all the time! For instance, inside TV remotes and cable television receivers have become favorite harborages for bed bugs.

More bed bugs are being found off the bed than on the bed. But one thing is clear. Bed bugs are here to stay for a while. They are not going away any time soon.

bed bug icon

CARPENTER ANTS

  • Can carpenter ants bite?
    +
  • Do carpenter ants eat wood like termites?
    +
  • Do carpenter ants do as much damage as termites?
    +
  • Do carpenter ants have wings?
    +
  • Do carpenter ants look like termites?
    +
  • Do carpenter ants come in different sizes?
    +
  • How do I know if I have a problem with carpenter ants?
    +
  • Where will they make nests in my home?
    +
  • Does Get Rid Pest offer programs to treat carpenter ants?
    +
  • How does Get Rid Pest treat carpenter ants?
    +
bed bug icon

SMALL ANTS

  • Can you tell me a bit about ants?
    +
  • What do ants eat?
    +
  • What is a small ant?
    +
bed bug icon

CARPENTER BEES

Carpenter bees are large robust insects that look much like bumble bees. They have a bare, shiny black abdomen whereas bumble bees have a hairy abdomen with some yellow markings. Male carpenter bees, identified by the bright yellow spot in the middle of the head, are aggressive but quite harmless since they lack stingers. Females can sting if molested.

  • Will they sting me?
    +
  • How do I tell carpenter bees from other bees?
    +
  • How do you treat for carpenter bees?
    +
  • Do I need to treat them this way?
    +
  • Why do carpenter bees make holes?
    +
bed bug icon

ROACHES

Cockroaches are among the most common of insects. Fossil evidence indicates that cockroaches have been on earth for over 300 million years. They are considered one of the most successful groups of animals. Because cockroaches are so adaptable, they have successfully adjusted to living with humans. About 3,500 species of cockroaches exist worldwide, with 55 species found in the United States.

In the northeastern United States, only four species are common pests in structures. These are the German, brown-banded, Oriental, and American cockroaches. Cockroaches are "living fossils". This means that their basic shape and appearance has not changed for millions of years. Fossil remains of cockroaches have been dated before the appearance of the Dinosaurs and appear virtually identical to cockroaches we find today.

  • German Cockroaches
    +
  • American Cockroaches
    +
  • Oriental Cockroaches
    +
  • Brown-Banded Cockroaches
    +
bed bug icon

FLEAS & TICKS

  • Fleas
    +
  • Ticks
    +
bed bug icon

RACCOONS & SQUIRRELS

Inquisitive, methodical, intelligent, strong and destructive. For a homeowner a raccoon may be their worst nightmare. Ranging from 22-44 pounds, a raccoon is a sizeable intruder. Often nesting in houses, raccoons have become a nuisance pest in the Northeast United States. The raccoon is from the genus Procyon in the family Procyonedae. They prefer wooded swampy areas often near water and avoid high elevations. Breeding is from February to early March with a 63 day gestation period. The litters are generally 1-7 young. If it is consistently below 25 degrees or if it snows a lot, they will become dormant, spending weeks in a deep sleep yet never actually going into hibernation.

Raccoons can be destructive and leave quite a mess where they are nesting. The fecal matter and urine can ruin insulation, ceilings and any other area they nest in. The removal of nesting raccoons should be left to a professional New York State Licensed Trapper (Arrow has over 20 on staff) since they can be dangerous and carry rabies. For a complete inspection and evaluation please contact us and we will be happy to make an appointment to come over at your convenience.

Squirrels are members of the rodent family Sciuridae and typically have a long bushy tail and slender body. Squirrels vary in size from such tiny tropical forms as the pygmy squirrels, Myosciurus, of Africa, which are about 130mm (5 in) in length including the tail, to the giant squirrels, Ratufa, of Asia, which may attain 91cm (36in). The American eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus Carolinensis, typical of the tree squirrels, is native to the forests of the eastern half of the United States.

They normally nest in tree hollows or may construct leaf nests, which are used mainly as feeding shelters. Gray squirrels may breed in midwinter and again in late spring. Gestation is about 44 days, with usually two to four young per litter. Squirrels are very social animals and nest with their families. One can expect from 2-12 squirrels may be nesting together, this includes when they nest in an attic.

  • What time of year do raccoons and squirrels bear young?
    +
  • What are the signs of a raccoon intrusion? How do I know if I have a problem?
    +
  • Can you remove raccoons in my backyard?
    +
  • Do raccoons do damage inside attics?
    +
  • Do squirrels and raccoons chew wires?
    +
  • I think raccoons are living under my deck. What do I do?
    +
  • I am hearing noises. How can I tell what they are from?
    +
  • I have no pets but I have fleas. Where did they come from?
    +
  • I found a dead animal in my house. What concerns should I have?
    +
  • Can squirrels and raccoons fit into my chimney?
    +
  • How many squirrels can there be nesting in my attic?
    +
  • Does Get Rid Pest offer programs to treat nuisance wildlife?
    +
bed bug icon

MICE

  • Are mice a health threat for my family?
    +
  • How can I tell if house mice are in my home?
    +
  • Where are house mice found in the U.S.?
    +
  • How can they enter my home?
    +
  • If I do have mice in my house, how fast can they multiply?
    +
  • How do I get rid of these pests and assure myself that I did everything possible to keep new mice from entering my home again?
    +
bed bug icon

RATS

There are about 4,000 species of mammals in the world. At about 1500 species, rodents make up the largest group of mammals. Here in the northeast US, we are concerned with two species that we consider structural pests; the House Mouse and the Norway rat. Once thought to be 'dumb' animals, recent research has proven that rats and most likely mice are capable of cognitive reasoning. Next to man the most successful animal on earth is the House Mouse. Rodents living close to people and in their structures are called commensal rodents. Rodents will eat anything that humans eat and then some! Mice do not need standing water to survive. Mice are very efficient at conserving water and can get their water from the foods they eat. Rats, on the other hand, do need a ½ ounce of water daily and about 1 ½ ounces of food. Like humans, rats and mice need certain nutritional requirements to remain healthy. Both rats and mice eat a varied diet. Mice need only about 1/10th of an ounce of food a day to survive. Rats will lick the morning dew off grass and get enough water to survive.

Mice and rats have special abilities that have made their survival possible. Mice and rats have developed unique behavioral characteristics that permit them to live in close proximity to humans and to be rarely noticed. It is only when populations become large that their presence is discovered.

Both rats and mice carry diseases that are transmittable to humans. These include salmonella food poisoning, Leptospirosis, LCM, Hanta Virus and other diseases that can make people sick. Their droppings, urine and hair contaminate the environment and cause sensitive people to experience allergic reactions from these biological materials. Mice and rats contaminate stored food items with their fecal material, urine and hair. Their constant gnawing behavior causes structural damage and when electrical wires are the target of their gnawing, they can start fires and damage sensitive electronic items such as computers.

You will never eliminate these rodent pests but Arrow can provide the service necessary to effectively eliminate these rodent pests from your home or business and keep them out.

bed bug icon

TERMITES

  • Are termites active only in the spring when I see them swarm?
    +
  • What This Means for the Home Owner?
    +
  • Sometimes down south I see houses that are tented to treat for termites. Do they do that here in New Jersey?
    +
  • How do I tell flying ants from termites?
    +
  • When I have a termite problem does that mean that termites are living in my home?
    +
bed bug icon

YELLOW JACKET WASPS

Yellow Jacket wasps often become a nuisance especially from August through October, as they build up in large populations and scavenge for human food (carbonated beverages, cider, juices, ripe fruits and vegetables, candy, ice cream, fish, ham, hamburgers, hot dogs, etc.) at picnics, cookouts, outside restaurants, bakeries, campsites, fairs, sports events and other outdoor get-togethers. Many are attracted in large numbers to garbage cans and other trash receptacles. Others fly in and out of nests built around homes, buildings and areas where people live, work and play, causing fear and alarm.

Although yellow jackets are considered quite beneficial to agriculture since they feed abundantly on harmful flies and caterpillars, it is their boldness (sometimes aggressiveness) and painful stinging ability that cause most concern. Nevertheless, unless the threat of stings and nest location present a hazard, it is often best to wait for Mother Nature, with freezing temperatures in late November and December, to kill off these annual colonies. Stinging workers do not survive the winter and the same nest is not reused.